Issue #12 – Gardens

Issue #12 – Gardens

ISSUE #12: Gardens

The starting point for this issue was seeded by a recent Chapter & Verse theme – “garden”. The pieces quickly expand into thoughts on human relations, design protocols, predilections, and rationales, and the ethics that inform my work and life. Maybe you will be inspired to create a garden, or landscape, or neighborhood!


CONTENTS:

Gardens
Design Rules
Copy That
Precedented
Scholar Garden


NEWS AND NOTES:

Recommended Reading – A very good article about the transformative power of landscape. The Other Side of Broken Windows, by Eric Klinenberg (The New Yorker, 8/23, 2018).

Cover image: Seguinland, photograph by Bruce Wujcik

Precedented post image: Mario’s Hat, digital collage by Bruce Wujcik


 

Gardens

Gardens

Despite my chosen and beloved profession – landscape architecture – I do not like to design gardens very much at all. I have sorted out the reasons over the years and they are several. In the main, gardens are usually uninteresting problems to solve, from the perspective of an INTJ personality, which I am. We like patterns and patterning and also developing intricate systems that are layered, multivalent, responsive, and rich. Intriguing and compelling opportunities usually present themselves at larger scales,

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Copy That

Copy That

I have a problem with copying in general – really it is one of my pet peeves – that goes beyond the theoretical framework of landscape and building called genius loci: that a creation is fit to its time and context, making places that are truly local and distinct. Picasso famously said, “Great artists don’t borrow, they steal,” but I am offended nonetheless. Borrowing is out in the open, transparent, sources acknowledged,

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Precedented

Precedented

Here I cite the main references for my design work previously presented in MUSE, to give credit where credit is due.

Mirror Park – Design for Change
Eugene, Oregon

Panarchy – I adapted and applied the basic ideas of Panarchy theory (Panarchy 101/ Understanding the Complexity of Economic, Ecological, and Social Systems by C.S. Holling), i.e. that small frequent adjustments and adaptations moderate (manage) change and evolution,

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